SPU Assignments

Integrated Quarter Assignments:

electricity-lesson-1

post-read-2

pre-read-2

fraction-assessment

answer-key

theme-lesson

theme-pwrpt

reading-assessment-assign

post-reading

math-plan-overview

math-lesson-observation-january

pre-read-1

language-analysis

math-pre-and-post

how-to-reach-1

mlk-lesson

Methods quarter assignments:

how-to-reach-1

4-special-sessions-reflection

2-reflecting-on-science-autobiography

reading-literacy-final-writing-about-reading

number-talk-reflection

social-studies-methods-final

guided-reading-lesson-a-boy-and-a-jaguar

what-happened-to-the-basics-reflection

unit-overview

area-model-lesson

annotated-notes-2

annotated-notes-3

annotated-notes-4

annotated-notes-5

annotated-notes-6

annotated-notes-7

problem-of-practice

pop-2

pop-3

fea-1

fea-2

fea-3

classroom-management-int

academic-language-assignment

writing-about-reading

learning-trajectory-assignment

formative-assessments

clinical-interview-plan

clinical-interview-final

Section C part 2

A rule not enforced is not a rule at all.

In the world of education, rules are very important for teacher’s expectations to properly be communicated. How a child behaves often can result from the absence of rules being communicated with the student. In the section in “Classroom Management”, I loved how it was separated what kinds of rules there are – general and specific.

Throughout the past week, my mentor teacher has been absent from illness. She just returned today, and immediately she dove into her class expectations, her consequences for negative behavior, etc. I know she plans on going over the class rules together, so she will eventually write them all on a chart.

“School must be a safe and protected environment, where a student can come to learn without fear” (151); often times students who misbehave don’t understand that the actions they exhibit in the classroom affect the rest of the peers, their teacher, and their learning process. Rewards are also discussed in the section as they will make the kids want to perform good behavior because they receive prizes for it. The school I student teach at does this precisely with a system called “Star bucks”. Each student gets the chance to earn star bucks throughout the week, and can spend or save them to buy something from the school store. It works extremely well, and the kids love it!

Rules are rules. Overall, this article was rather informative on how to handle consequences in the appropriate manner, and it will come in handy for student teaching no doubt.
_________________________________________________________________

Unit C Reading

Be prepared.

Be prepared with your classroom, your assignments, your seating chart. The biggest message I received throughout this article was how important being prepared is for success in the classroom. You don’t want to have an overstimulating class for the student to walk into on the first day, it is okay to have a few bulletin boards bare.

One thing that surprised me was “visit the home of each student before school begins”. I didn’t even know this was allowed in school districts? I think the idea of seeing the students on their territory is a good idea to get more connected with them, but I’ve never had a teacher do that for me in my life so I can’t personally defend the claim that this is necessary.

________________________________________________________________

First Day of School Reading (Unit B)

The first day of school… it was and is the most exciting night of the year (well, besides Christmas Eve of course). Ever since I was a kid, the build up for a new teacher, new lessons, new adventures, it was all just too much excitement for little ol’ Sasha to handle. But why was it this way for me? Some of my other friends dreaded the first day of school because that meant summer was over, their freedom was gone, and we were saying hello to homework. Maybe it was my optimistic attitude, or maybe it was something else.

While reading the first 40 pages of “First Day of School”, I was immediately hit by percentages and facts that gave me hope as a future educator to set my students up for success as much as I can. As the chapter explains, there is no correlation between success and family background, race, financial status, etc. It is all about the child’s attitude. As their guide through their academic careers it is our job to make sure the students feel as welcomed and excited about school as possible. So maybe it was because I had so many fantastic teachers, and that was why I felt about the first day of school. But what about the terrible teachers I had to? What made me want to continue the way I did so positively?

This is where family comes into place. Teachers and parents must work together for their students to feel like they can succeed in the classroom and in the world. Like how the article says, we must show that we care. Whether that is through setting high, positive, realistic expectations for students to dressing the way I want to be treated, “we are walking, talking advertisements for who we are” (54) – and kids will notice right away if shown otherwise.

The other pieces of the chapter, such as addressing the student by name, how repetition is key, etc. I have heard from previous education courses, but was an excellent reminder as I start diving into student teaching. The kiddos are starting their first day on Thursday, so I’ll have to keep these notes in my back pocket for when the students finally fill the spaces of empty desks.